AATU vs Royal Canin

AATU vs Royal Canin

This comparison from PetMonkey provides you with all you need to know about which of these top pet food brands best suits your dog or cat.

Choose AATU pet food if you want:

 Holistic pet food containing at least 80% natural meat and fish protein

 A wide variety of Dog Food and Cat Food flavours from a trusted brand

 Hand baked 'Artisan' pet treats with high quality ingredients 

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Pet Monkey - Royal Canin Brand Logo

Choose Royal Canin pet food if you want:

 Scientifically proven formulas targeted to the needs of different breeds

High quality, protein-rich kibbles

Food to match your individual pet e.g. Royal Canin Active Life Outdoor 7+ Dry Cat Food - 10kg

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Brand heritage: AATU vs Royal Canin

AATU is a brand owned by Pet Food UK Ltd which also owns Barking Heads, Meowing Heads and Bailey Bites. The company was founded in 2008 and produces Dog Food and Cat Food which it distributes through independent stockists and pet food specialists. Mars owns Royal Canin and its manufactures pet food in Missouri and South Dakota in the United States.

Approach and classification: AATU vs Royal Canin

AATU classes its pet foods into either dog or cat varieties. The dog food categories include dog food, puppy food and treats. Cat food is an umbrella term for all cat products. AATU uses a natural approach to manufacturing its products.  It makes pet food from fresh ingredients and it manufactures products in small amounts. 

AATU dog and cat foods do not contain GM ingredients.  The brand's foods are also completely free from grain, gluten, white potato and any artificial colours, preservatives or flavours.

Royal Canin takes an individual approach. Its philosophy is that each dog or cat is different to others. Therefore the company creates products based around different pet profiles such as Royal Canin Giant Starter Mother & Babydog Dog Food - 15kg.

Hence, an amazing product range with food for every breed, size, age and lifestyle you can think of! Royal Canin takes a functional approach to describing its pet food: It does this rather than focusing it's branding on flavour or the taste of ingredients.

Dry food: AATU vs Royal Canin

AATU dry dog and cat food products focus on flavoursome, natural ingredients with around 80% single protein content. For example, AATU for Cats 85/15 Dry Cat Food - Salmon & Herring which includes pre-cooked fresh and raw protein to ensure cats can digest the meat efficiently.

AATU has a good range of high quality protein flavours: For example AATU For Dogs 80/20 Adult Dry Dog Food - Duck is a winner. AATU ethically produces its pet foods with single protein ingredients for both cats and dogs. You will find nothing noxious in these dry food bags.

Royal Canin's selection of dry pet foods is extensive and prescriptive. You can choose it according to your cat or dog's breed, size and age rather than based on choice of flavour. For instance, Royal Canin French Bulldog Puppy Dry Dog Food - 10kg.  

 

It is specifically designed as a complete meal. It is ideal if you have a French Bulldog between 2 months and 1 year old.

Similarly, Royal Canin Light Weight Care Dry Cat Food - 10kg, is perfect for cats from 1-7 years old and helps to keep them slim. The packaging however doesn't mention particular flavours. Instead it states that this is a light weight kibble which is good for supporting weight maintenance and your cat's immune system. Therefore, your choice of dry food would depend on how you like to make your purchasing decision. 

Wet food: AATU vs Royal Canin

When it comes to wet pet food, AATU is available from PetMonkey in 400g tins. AATU contains enough nutrition so that you can use it as a complete meal. Plus it can also top a dry food mix to add delicious flavour and texture. AATU For Dogs Wet Dog Food - Duck & Turkey 6 x 400g is just one example from this range of tasty flavours. The protein content is 90% and the moisture content of this wet food is 76%.

Royal Canin wet pet food products are available in plastic pouches such as Royal Canin Sterilised In Gravy Wet Cat Food - 12 x 85g


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This wet cat food contains meat and animal derivatives; a protein content of 9% and a moisture content of 81%.  Royal Canin wet dog food includes a similar range such as Royal Canin Maxi Adult in Gravy Wet Dog Food - 10 x 140g. This wet food is ideal for adult, large breed dogs.

Summary of Wet and Dry Food Differences: AATU vs Royal Canin

The key difference between the two brands in terms of content and packaging is choice. Royal Canin has cleverly broken down the choices into market segments: Into functional, prescriptive benefits for your pets. For example, Royal Canin First Age Mother & Baby Cat Dry Cat Food - 4kg provides the nutritious elements of mother's milk which is required in order to wean onto solid food.

Following its own continuous research, this brand uses clearly defined categories to cater for the bespoke needs of different pets. Another example of this is: Royal Canin Dachshund Adult Dry Dog Food - 1.5kg and if you have a large dog which is getting on in years then try Royal Canin Maxi Ageing 8+ Dry Dog Food - 3kg.

This dog food choice from Royal Canin contains very high quality levels of protein. It also includes a balanced level of dietary fibre. This makes the food very easy on the stomach of older dogs.

While there's not much reference to your pets' own flavour preferences, Royal Canin do however have products designed to cater for fussy eaters.  Their food is also designed for different breeds' physical requirements. There will be a great product in this range to suit whatever cat or dog you have. For specific recipes tailored to your pet's needs, then Royal Canin is the best brand you will find.

On the other hand, AATU, from a much younger company than Mars, is still focusing on hand baking and small batch quantities. With a fabulous range of flavoured recipes, such as AATU For Cats Wet Cat Food Pouches - Salmon, Chicken & Prawn 16 x 85g its emphasis is on high quality, wholesome, natural ingredients and single protein recipes. AATU describes itself as an ethical brand. Its use of tin in packaging, rather than plastic may also affect your choice of purchase.

AATU For Dogs 80/20 Adult Dry Dog Food - Duck contains "Free Run Duck" with freshly prepared, preservative free meat. This is also a perfect example of the values of the brand which uses a single protein 80/20 ratio diet to minimise allergic reactions. (80% duck and 20% vegetables, herbs, fruit and botanicals). 

AATU is a very popular pet food brand, with its fresh and wholesome approach. Also, its wet and dry products, made in small batch recipes without artificial elements, make them an excellent choice for discerning pet owners.

Dog Treats and Cat Treats: AATU vs Royal Canin

Both brands provide a range of Dog Treats and Cat Treats. AATU's range of Artisan Bakes are free from grain, white potato and gluten. AATU Artisan Bakes Dog Treats - Chicken - 150g includes high quality ingredients. 

AATU Artisan Bakes Puppy Treats 150g

AATU Artisan Bakes Puppy Treats - Chicken & Salmon are an ideal, tasty training reward for puppies. AATU also cook these snacks in renewable and sustainable energy sourced burning ovens. This means they have a very small effect on the planet as well as being good for your dog too.

Royal Canin provide treats labelled as the the only veterinary-exclusive treats available to support specific dietary needs. This is in line with their approach to pet food and can be clearly seen in its Royal Canin Urinary Care Dry Cat Food.

Both brands say their treats should make up no more than 10% of your pet's daily food intake.

Composition: AATU vs Royal Canin

What's in AATU and Royal Canin pet foods? These overviews provide you with an in-depth look at the pet food recipes for each brand.

Royal Canin dog food contains:

  • Dehydrated poultry protein – high quality and full of goodness
  • Animal derivatives – meat from animals rather than plants or vegetables
  • Animal by-products – These are good quality but do not include animal parts like hooves
  • Grains and carbohydrates – which are easy to digest and good for energy

What we also love about Royal Canin is the handy feeding guides. This means you know exactly how much to feed your dog or cat. 

The table above shows exactly how much Royal Canin Mini Dermacomfort to feed your dog.

AATU usually contains: Meat and animal derivatives, oils and fats, cereals, vegetable protein extracts, derivatives of vegetable origin, minerals and yeasts. The pet food will also contain various sugars, molluscs and crustaceans Crude ash, Crude fibre, Crude oil fats, moisture and protein too. They also include Vitamin D3: Iron Iodine, Copper, Manganese and Zinc in differing quantities too. AATU also provide a feeding guide which gives a good outline of suggested feeding quantities.

Where can I get it? AATU vs Royal Canin

Royal Canin dog food is only available from vets and specialist pet retailers. You can buy AATU online from the brand and from specialist pet outlets as well. Therefore, we are pleased to sell both of these brands at competitive prices here at PetMonkey.

How much does it cost? AATU vs Royal Canin

Royal Canin Beagle Adult Dry Dog Food - 12kg costs around £3 per kilogram and AATU For Dogs 80/20 Adult Dry Dog Food - Chicken costs about £6 per kilogram. However, it is hard to make a direct comparison. As the brands have very little in common in their approaches to pet food, any price comparison is irrelevant. So, what makes you buy one or the other is more likely to be based on other factors.  These might include composition, your pet's needs and other circumstances. 

AATU vs Royal Canin - ready to shop?

You will find the most competitive prices for both of these brands here at PetMonkey.


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